Advanced Computing in the Age of AI|Wednesday, September 30, 2020
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6 Key Questions American Manufacturing Executives Should Be Asking Themselves Today 

<img style="float: left;" src="http://media2.hpcwire.com/dmr/car-production2_cropped.jpg" alt="" width="95" height="87" />During the development of the Third Annual American Manufacturing Strategies Summit 2012, an advisory board of industry experts identified a number of key questions every manufacturing executive should be asking as they work to grow their business in a still-volatile economy.

There is no shortage of debate and discussion over the future of American manufacturing: From political campaigns and boardroom tables, to national newspapers and industry journals, to academic institutions and economic think-tanks, there is no shortage of ideas about how the U.S. economy in general and manufacturing in particular will evolve to meet the new challenges and realities of the 21st Century.

The United States was built on its industrial prowess; from cars and planes to soft drinks and light bulbs, Made in the USA was a brand that consumers know they can trust. While that reputation has only grown with continuous investment in quality control and efficient production methods, the last few decades have seen enormous changes as a global economy has moved many jobs overseas, taking the supply chains and labor pool of trained workers with them.

Despite this trend, a growing sense of optimism and a renewed commitment to U.S. competitive advantage seems to be taking root in the manufacturing community. During the development of the Third Annual American Manufacturing Strategies Summit 2012, an advisory board of industry experts identified a number of key questions every manufacturing executive should be asking as they work to grow their business in a still-volatile economy:

 1.     Are we using the best tools, tactics, and technology available to maintain our competitive advantage?

2.     Does reshoring make good business sense as my company optimizes its global footprint?

3.     How do we develop, attract, and retain the skilled workers we will need to succeed?

4.     How can we get proactive about risk management, especially when looking at our supply chain?

5.     What public and private programs, organizations, and associations exist to help us succeed in embracing new ways of doing business?

6.     What can I bring to my organization as a leader to drive positive outcomes on new ideas and improved processes?

For three days in October several hundred people including a speaker faculty of over fifty industry experts drawn from some of the most successful manufacturing organizations in the United States will seek to answer these and other questions in a series of case studies, panel discussions, workshops, keynote presentations, and master classes based on their own experiences.

If you are interested in joining this discussion or would like more insight on these issues, visit: www.manufacturing-summit.com

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